DEQ to screen municipal water systems for Japanese radiation

Radiation in the drinking water confirmed! Obviously this is a topic we can’t ignore. Radiation in our water and food supplies has been confirmed in a number of states near the west coast. We must take the steps to eliminate nuclear power plants so this problem doesn’t get worse from these antiquated generators – there are REAL alternatives. Hello Nikola Tesla, your time is now; please accept our apology for blocking your technology in 1922.
-Joshua


Story Updated: Apr 20, 2011


 DEQ to screen Idaho municipal water systems for radiation


BOISE — The Idaho Department of Environmental Quality is planning to screen municipal water systems across the state to see if radioactive material from the Japanese nuclear fallout has gotten into drinking water systems — as it has in trace amounts in Boise.


The Environmental Protection Agency’s radiation monitoring network detected minuscule amounts of radioactive iodine in drinking water in Boise and Richland, Wash. since problems erupted at Japan’s Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant.


The EPA says the radioactive material probably got into the city’s drinking water system through the Boise River.


Actually radiation can be found anywhere. it’s all around us, generated naturally.


“Just living on this planet we get radiation,” said the DEQ’s Mark Dietrich.


But the radioactive material Iodine-131 comes uniquely from nuclear reactors. And as a result of the fallout from the damaged reactors in Japan, very low levels of Iodine-131 were showed up in Boise’s drinking water.


Now the Idaho DEQ plans to screen selected municipal drinking water systems served by surface water.


“We would not expect to find levels of Iodine-131 that would generate any public health hazard at all,” Dietrich told KBOI-TV. “We just want to see if there are other detections.”


In the immediate aftermath of the Japanese nuclear accident, some local pharmacies and the Boise Army/Navy Store were flooded with calls for potassium iodide which protects the thyroid from radiation.


“We looked around, and found some,” said Dan Turrittin with the Army/Navy store. “But by the time we brought it in, the panic seemed to subside.”


Experts say there’s no need for potassium iodide — or for panic.


But the whole thing appears to underscore the most unscientific, but very human feeling, that the four corners of the earth seem to be shrinking in the 21st century.


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